VE4CNR/IRLP, POE voltage upgrades and another contest …

Quite some time ago, the MRS repeater, VE4WRS, had to vacate it’s location due to changes in the site contracts of our sponsor.  That was a great location for an amateur radio repeater – and it was the repeater that operated a local IRLP gateway.  While there are a few of these gateways around town, this was was great as it had great coverage and it was on a repeater and not a simplex node. It has been in the list of things to do for the MRS – Manitoba Repeater Society for a bit, I was asked to help get this back on-line.  While I’m not a member of the exec, but am a paid-up member of the MRS (you should too:  Join/Renew MRS today!, I always enjoy helping out where I can.  So, I arrange to pick up the gear from Dick VE4HK from the storage bin, take it home and ensure it’s reconfigured and up to date, gets registered and gets a new node number IRLP 1504 @ VE4CNR .  Testing it at my home with my interface and radio – it works great!  The new site has physical access available around 9-5 and is in the ENE part of the city.  With me living in the SE and working in the SW, it’s not the easiest place to get to during normal working hours.  After having a few difficulties with interconnecting the radio system to the controller, we get Yuri VE4ACX involved and lends a hand.  We agree we need to make a visit and I take a day off work and we agree to meet up early in the morning (early for some anyways hi hi) .. and meet at the site.  I setup my laptop and we work on getting it all hooked in:

 

ve4cnr with va4wan

One of the reasons we can provide the IRLP system access there is that we have an already established connection to our city-wide VA4WAN amateur radio high-speed network!  You too can join/renew: Join/Renew VA4WAN!

VA4WAN dugald site – high-speed network

The work that was previously done there easily facilitates a connection to it.  Plugging in the ethernet cable and the bits start flying by.

Diagnosing a few items, the issue comes to light and a change in connection is done and then, viola, audio comes back in larger than life!  Running a test with some local (and remote) systems shows that the audio is awesome and gets good reviews by those with better ears than mine.  (Back in my younger years, I do recall a few times forgetting to wear my ear defenders/plugs during firing of the 105mm howitzers.  Only takes once (or twice) to remember hi hi).

The computer was left at the site and the rest of the goods was put back into the storage locker at the site:

 

storage
storage

I had not been to this site before – the rest of the guys put up our VA4WAN access to this site prior.  So, we have two backhauls – 1 to 55N and another to 60C – for redundancy.  There’s still work to be done on network reconfiguration etc, but, hey, it’s there.

back-hauls

there’s also a local 2.3GHz connection for guys in the area.  (It’s kinda wayyyyy up there, so I’ll highlight it a bit):

local 2.3GHz 270degree sector

and finally .. as we put our gear back in our respective trunks, Walter gives me a present to take back … the test gear we used for our AllStarLink connection at his site will now be repurposed for the remote Winkler site (VE4TOM), so I’ll set that up for programming – just waiting on a local static ip from their config out there.  AND — he was able to modify the voltage on this POE switch to provide 24v to support all our POE gear!  That is awesome – and will certainly help out and be used for our site at 55N!

re-purpose the RPi and URI and new upgraded voltage for this POE switch!

So, all-in-all, that was a good morning out.  Then out to coffee we go to see the rest of the coffee crowd.  Thanks to Walter VE4VB and Yuri VE4ACX for their fine work as always.

 

Now – onto my last item of the day — contesting.  Yesterday was the NAQP SSB August contest.  Conditions were so-so going into it and they stayed that way – not too good.  But, I was able to put in a few hours and made shy of 100 contacts, so not too shabby for me!  I was equally surprised how well 40m turned out – had some great contacts on that band and it turned out I made more than on 20m.  I did not hear any VE4 stations on there – quite a number of the contacts I made thanked me for the VE4/MB section mult.  For me, 80 was so poor, I had trouble hearing anyone, and 160 was non-existent.  (read need bigger antennas!) Now to my other task today – submit the logs – they only give you a week to get them in.  Oh yeah, in case you don’t know, I use VE4EV as my callsign when operating contests – so if you hear me, drop by and say hi.

score – or so I think

73, Dan ve4drk

summery days …

I’ve heard about this one mode before – a couple of local hams do sailing on our big lake and make a run way up north now and then.  They use HF (mostly 80m I hear) to check in and get updates to the weather, pass traffic etc.  VE4DXR and VE4ESX both utilize the bands to stay in contact with folks ‘back home’.  Leor was using some mode that I had not really heard of before – winlink.  It’s a messaging system that can utilize different mediums to exchange messages with other hams – be it HF, VHF or regular internet technologies.  The interesting thing on this is that the winlink system has grown to be more of a fault-tolerant, redundant, multi-mode communications hub for store/forward of traffic.  Seems it also has it’s place in the ham emergency communications arena, widely used as a backup communications mode for a number of emergency and relief agencies.  So, timeliness, another local ham VE4UA had been running his local packet bbs system (since the days of yore) and it was really not getting any usage from what Werner was indicating, so he was thinking of re-purposing the gear to be something more useful.  Others got wind of the information and mentioned about setting up a WinLink system for EMCOMM – so he decided to repurpose his gear for that local mode, and was looking for some trials.  Me, not being active on packet (since the days of yore as well), decided to take my trusty Yaesu FT1500 mobile and MFJ 1278 and the cable I got provisioned to me by another local ham (VE4VR) to set out and try this new mode.  Within the hour I was able to get software downloaded onto my trusty core2 dual processor machine running win10 (another gift from VE4VR) – (which by the way HAS A DB9 SERIAL PLUG! yes!) – got the registration completed and offered the winlink team a donation for their fine work they do, hooked everything all up and away I go — the current meter on the power supply goes to  8amps with the 50watt output of my radio – hooked up to my dual stacked 5/8 on top of the house and I get a FULL SCALE reply back from Werner’s system.  Soon enough, I figure out the software and send/receive messages galore on packet winlink.  Interesting.  I’ll have to try scaling back the power a bit – we might have a better RF connectivity  than I had anticipated.  Looking around a bit at the winlink system, there’s no real HF gateways in the RF dead spot of the prairies – maybe there is opportunity for a local group to establish an EMCOMM HF gateway and serve the locals sailing up north and beyond! hint hint …

Seems our national news picked up on a story emanating out of the east coast – where it appears someone decided to slice up a couple of strands of fiber-optic cable servicing the WHOLE REGION.  Hmmm – so much for redundancy there!  The word was that most forms of communications were cut – cell, internet, etc.  So the local ham groups had been put on alert for setting out to provide emergency traffic passing.  Although the service was restored fairly quickly, it did highlight some pressing issues that need to be reviewed.  The local news of the area:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/amateur-radio-atlantic-canada-bell-phone-outage-1.4236756

and our local news a little ways back:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/ham-radio-enthusiasts-keeping-old-technology-alive-1.1397214

Interesting that there was only FM discussion, no HF discussion – but, there you have it.

It’s summer time and is great to be out on my  bike again – the XYL and I took a ride out to the local park and enjoyed the ride and the relaxation of the park.  While on the way I happen to spy a few antennas here and there, so thought I’d add a little item on ‘spot-the-antenna’ … whom are these:

which one(s) are our ham antennas 🙂
this one is an easy one – on the way to the park
no idea whose this may be – but there are other hams on the street I know of…

seems I keep looking up when riding around, trying to see who has what kind of gear in the air.

Some other cool things are happening with the ham geekdom these days.  Expansion and refinement of our local high-speed network VA4WAN has progressed a bit further.  The guys spent a fair amount of time organizing and then spending the ENTIRE DAY on top of the building in what must have been the hottest day of the year!  Contrast that with the coldest day of the year here:  http://ve4drk.keizer.ca/?p=182

More work done on the networking (hardware wise) and cleaning up the connections.  Fiber connection will be replacing the current copper connection to our friendly ham provider les.net, who continues to offer us his inter-bits!  An addition of another camera on the south, and hopefully some more 3GHz gear running will help smoother the connectivity out a bit.

Our Dugald road site connection is also in operation – after a slight downtime at the interim site at 60C due to power issues.  (So, now i have a small project to take the thermometer William donated and hook it up to a pi to start registering what the temps are in that enclosure a bit more.  More to come on that later.  With the inter-bits back on-line at Dugald road, I reconfigured the IRLP machine to be a new node to replace the old venerable VE4WRS system.  Thanks to Walter VE4VB for the use of his repeater (VE4CNR) to host this system.  It is currently connected, but we need to pay it a visit to get the one-way audio corrected – I’m sure it will only be a few minutes to figure it out – or we have some bad hardware to replace on the computer system.  Either way, having a reliable repeater with our ham connectivity will be great.

I’ve re-programmed my DMR radio again – trying out another local DMR system – seems there’s some growth in them thar’ hills – William was able to setup a 2.3 system to give to Shaun to get his system on the air and we got the DNS registered to have it updated as well, so will keep an eye on that front.

Seems I have more uses for radio than I have cable for – so I’m in search for some decent RG213 or 9913 or LMR type of cable.  Looking at the shack, I currently have 6 radios in constant operation!  and of course I want to put more on-line too – so – more cable is in the works.  If you know of a source, drop me a line — i’m good @ RAC.

Enough for now – time to get on with the day and have some more summery fun.

73, Dan ve4drk